Kākāpō

kakapo

close up with a kākāpō

The kākāpō is the heaviest parrot in the world it can weigh up to 3 kg. Kakapo means parrot of the night

Kākāpō has yellow and green feathers with a hooked beak and orange feet with green wings

Kākāpō live in the South Island of New Zealand

Kākāpō make nests on the ground and are good at climbing trees. Their hooked beak helps them eat berries.

Kākāpō are related to owls and are the most endangered bird. There are between 90 and 80 left.

Illustrated and written by WilGor

Keas

Kea

Kea

Keas are the heaviest parrot in the world.

Keas are green and have orange underneath their wings.

Keas live in the mountains and mostly live in the South Island.

Keas eat dead meat and food scraps and plastic lids.

Keas scratch their head feathers with their feet.

Illustrated and written by HarAnn

Morepork – Ruru

Morepork or Ruru

Morepork or Ruru

Morepork are a bird of prey and a big owl.  Morepork are native to New Zealand.

A Morepork looks like a big brown owl with big wings and a hooked beak.  It has big eyes to see in the dark.

Morepork live in the New Zealand forests.  They perch on big branches with lots of leaves.

Morepork make a sound that goes “more pork, more pork”.  They eat bugs like worms and insects that fly.  Morepork lay 2 or 3 white eggs.  They hatch after 20 to 30 days.  Only the female seems to incubate the eggs and she is fed by the male on the nest.  The chicks fledge after about 34 days.  Morepork like to seek food at night.

Illustrated and written by TayCen

Kea

kea-kauram.jpg

Kea

The Kea is a mountain parrot. It’s a New Zealand native bird. Sometimes it’s called a clown bird. The Kea is related to the forest kaka.

The Kea’s back and wings are green, its nostrils are grey and its beak is black. Their green feathers are edged with black. Under its wings it’s orange. Kea grow up to 50cm long.

Between 1,000 and 5,000 kea live in the wild. They live in the mountains, on the western side of the Southern Alps, Kaikoura ranges and Tararua ranges of the North Island. It might also be seen on river flats.

Kea eat food scraps, dead meat, snow berries, leaves, buds, fruits, seeds and grubs. Kea build their nests under logs. In July to January they lay two to four white eggs. Kea fly high when traveling far.

Kea are one of the most intelligent birds in the world: it is our funny, naughty native parrot.

Illustrated and written by KauRam

Kea

A Kea

A Kea

Keas are the heaviest parrot in the world.

Keas are green and have orange underneath their wings.

Keas live in the mountains and mostly live in the South Island.

Keas hunt for animals.

Keas scratch their head feathers.

Illustrated and written by GorCar

Kingfisher

Kingfisher

Kingfisher

A kingfisher is bird from New Zealand and it’s maori name is kotare.

The kingfisher is blue, black, green, brown, yellow and their beak is black.

It dives down into the water to catch fish to eat. And it eats lizards and even mice.

They can go under the water to get food.

Illustrated and written by BarHam

Tui

A Tui (Parson Bird)

A Tui (Parson Bird)

The Tui has beautiful colours. Its Maori name is Tui. The Tui’s cousin is the Bellbird.

 

The tui’s colours are ,blue, green, black ,white and brown. The male is 32cms the female is 29cms. The female’s colours are brown and white. The Tui’s length is 30 cm. Tui are also called parson birds because of the two curled tufts of white feathers on their throats.

The Tui is found in the New Zealand forest and bush patches throughout the North Island. There are a few in the beech forests of the South Island.

The Tui lays two to four eggs sometimes twice a year. They eat berries from the forest trees, shrubs and some insects. Tui nest in September to January. Females build the bulky nests of twigs and dried grasses lined with feathers and soft material in tree forks. The Tui chicks are then fed by both parents on nectar, berries and insects. Being honeyeaters, they search for nectar from the forest trees, flowers and shrubs, extracting it with long brush-tipped tongues. Tui can be seen in summer taking nectar from pohutukawa and flax flowers along the coast and hanging upside down to sip from kowhai flowers.

Its call is so high-pitched that a human ear cannot hear it.

Illustrated and written by ArtSha